BRACscholars- How did world poorest women (Bangladesh) build the world's number 1 sustainability goals economy? ..resilient community building plus

national financial servicesultra poor grant :: village microfinance plus : : remittances : city bank :; merchant banking for poor ::
village health services village para-health- 10 most basic infant/maternal disease - wash program -- last mile specific solution eg TB
food security agricultural markets rice science other veggies science poultry dairy
digital banking model for up to billion unbanked bkash
childrens education networks

largest non gov provider of primary and pre-primary schools - teen-mentoring clubs -secondary scholarships

BRAC U
other national markets ..
international financial services remittances to bangladesh ---- partner funding for bangladesh and 13 countries - global club of "good" banks
other


.


,,Learning, and social-economic action networking, around BRAC=the world's largest NGO partnership economy is a unique pursuit.
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Tuesday, December 31, 2019

resilient community and other livelihood skills which came first at BRAC

related ref Rural Keynesianism by chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk
The Economist's end poverty sub-editor and first journalist of the internet's entrepreneurial revolution

Before my father Norman Macrae died in 2010, he set up a small legacy for mainly student female journalist to visit bangladesh to help journalise how women had been empowered to build that nation born in 1971 tenth most populous and 2nd poorest in the world

HOW DID BRAC BUILD AN EDUCATIONAL ECONOMY
I was privileged to enjoy several meetings with sir fazle abed of brac- he was concerned because the nobel peace laureate muhammad yunus had his system confiscated by the government and quite frankly the way western educators and the microcreditsummit process launched (from 1997 onwards) by the clintons explained microfinance was in critical (systemic and exponential growth) ways the exact opposite of how brac truly empowered women to build the bangladeshi economy - far the largest girls empowerment system ever designed with the exception of China. Brac is the benchmark case at huge scale of how healthy and skills-educated societies grow a place across generations not vice versa.

Nowhere in the 75 years since world war 2 has there been a servant leader like Fazle Abed. Before dedicating 50 years to working with the poorest village women he had been the regional ceo for the shell oil multinational. Then at age 35 a cyclone killed half a million people all around him. He concluded that the oil business was meaningless compared with human development work, returned to london to settle up has affairs and to see his flat in Putney, and returned to bangladesh in 1972 with about 20000 dollars. Right from the start, Abed's idea was to maximise community capacity - firstly by peer to training of how to build the minimal village homes but in a way that would be monsoon proof and as far as possible cyclone proof. Because of his experience with global business he was trusted to organise bottom-up disaster relief processes local capacity building was different to the norm of a global relief agency flying in , doing the relief, and then flying out again. It also meant that BRAC's dna was always about skills training- its servant leaders did not see themselves as banker or adminstrators but coaches as well as inventors of microfranchise designs- the most effective and efficient way that villagers could make things or provide services including health and safety.

Tuesday, December 1, 2015

africa collaboration cafe half day AT CUNY Brooklyn

Tuesday, November 24, 2015

what a lot we learnt for startup november

with special thanks to leaders of startup san diego, start up new york and startup african women and kenya rsvp  isabella@ unacknowledgedgiant.com if you have a startup learning to share

from kauffman

Startup Nations Awards Bring a Close to Global Entrepreneurship Week

nov sns 3Startup-focused policymakers and advisers gathered this weekend in Monterrey, Mexico, for the Startup Nations Summit (SNS) – and the official closing of Global Entrepreneurship Week.
The Startup Nations community has doubled in size this year, reflecting an increase in government interest to benchmark their efforts and properly evaluate the policies and programs being implemented around the world. The SNS produced a wealth of ideas from policymakers in more than 60 countries and in the weeks ahead, we hope to be able to share with you some of the most effective policies and programs being implemented – as well as new possibilities that can help communities around the world.
Against the backdrop of Startup Nations delegates sharing their experiences on various approaches to accelerate new and young firm formation in their countries, four individuals were recognized for their recent contributions in advancing entrepreneurship policy. 
With global interest in the economic power of new and young firms expanding rapidly, the Startup Nations Awards were created to encourage and guide a new generation of policymakers committed to helping entrepreneurs flourish.
Dr. Choi Yanghee, South Korea’s Minister of Science, ICT and Future Planning, received the Startup Nations Award for National Policy Leadership. He is the driving force behind the Creative Economy Initiative, one of Korea’s biggest administrative goals. Through the program, Choi has supervised the establishment of 17 Centers for Creative Economy and Innovation across major cities and regions, matching each of the Centers with leading companies. The Centers began opening in September 2014.
More than 300 startups have already come through the Centers, and 203 firms have shared $31 million in investments to date. As of August, 42,000 people have already participated in training and seminars on business creation through the Centers.
Neelie Kroes, former vice president of the European Commission and a special envoy for startups in the Netherlands, received the Startup Nations Award for Groundbreaking Policy Thinking. She was recognized for her instrumental analysis, innovative policy approaches and groundbreaking program concepts which significantly expand the frontier of entrepreneurship policy thinking in the Netherlands and throughout Europe. Of note was her plan to start and stop her initiative in 18 months – a bold challenge to others looking to have a big punch fast.
For the past six years, Kroes has helped put the subject of startups firmly on the agendas of major companies, banks, investors, government entities and knowledge institutes. She served as vice president of the European Commission for the Digital Agenda and put the topic of startups high on the European agenda.
After stepping down from the European Commission, Kroes was appointed to lead StartupDelta, an initiative to make the Netherlands the best-connected startup ecosystem and in Europe’s top three for startups.
Kroes was a key influencer in the Startup Europe program that aims to strengthen the business environment for startups so that their ideas and businesses can start and grow in the European Union. Part of that program was the Startup Leaders Manifesto, with inspiring founders from, Skype, Tuenti and Rovio, that was presented to the Chairman of the European Council. The Startup Leaders Manifesto inspired other national startup communities to do the same in their countries. This led a movement within the EU to change the business climate in favor of startups. 
At the local level, Bart De Wever, mayor of Antwerp, Belgium, received the Startup Nations Award for Local Policy Leadership. He and his team introduced the Antwerp Startup City Program in 2014, as an ambitious and all-encompassing response to the absence of a startup scene or city-wide program. 
The Belgian city’s initiative has four main goals – to stimulate entrepreneurship, provide a premium incubator network, have virtual incubation and see growth and internationalization. The program has improved Antwerp’s digital infrastructure by installing wireless Internet connections, LoRa and open-sensor networks. An aspect of the program, the City of Things project, improves Antwerp’s “user experience,” and involves local startups in continuously improving the digital infrastructure. 
The Startup Nations Summit was made possible by the commitment and leadership of Mexico’s National Institute of the Entrepreneur (INADEM). Since it was created in 2013, INADEM has worked to implement and refine programs addressing entrepreneurs’ needs – with a particular focus on businesses that contribute to solving societal problems through innovation. Its goals are: consolidating a healthy environment for the creation of new enterprises, particularly high-impact businesses; promoting an entrepreneurial culture among young people; building a network of specialized mentors; establishing new incubation models; helping fund the startup and expansion processes; and supporting startups and firms that are “born global.” In recognition of INADEM’s contributions to its country and to the Startup Nations movement, Enrique Jacob Rocha received the Startup Nations Award for Global Leadership. 
Overall, the gathering included a mix of substantive working sessions on effective approaches to accelerate new and young firm formation, along with inspirational and informative speeches from top-notch entrepreneurs like Chris O’Neill, CEO of Evernote, Uri Levine, founder of Waze, and Daymond John, founder of FUBU and part of ABC-TV’s “Shark Tank.” 
Silicon Valley, of course, cannot be replicated. There were unique factors that shaped it that will not likely happen in another place.  However, as each community embraces its own strengths, the Startup Nations community of policymakers can play an important role in identifying smarter ways the public sector can encourage thriving entrepreneurial ecosystems.  As we enter the nomination period for the 2016 Startup Nations Awards, let us know of the remarkable people and ideas being tested at local and national levels around the world.
Calling all envoys wherever aid markets are  not using mobile preferentially for poor, or are broken systems - due to top down financial-politico empires, wargamers or conditional aid, lack of end to end transparency of value chain or so so much PR greenwashing that a best for the world local solution simply cant afford to open source its replication to other countries. Also note the newly urgent failures caused by the reality that sustainable futures require compound investments over intergenerational periods not 90 day profit-takers audits

examples of best transformational app innovated by under 30s
give directly

examples of best for world solutions worthy of replicaaion
south africa's university for disadvantaged students - now 15000 alumni rich and transforming to 7th grade curriculum intended for teenagers to co-create million jobs in next 7 years

lucknow city montessori - the world's largest school would probably be where gandhi and montessori would be happiest to co-work if alive today- uniquely its thousand teachers love change- their innovations include the only peace curriculum certified by Unesco and an end adult illiteracy solution which children can usually help people achieve during their summer holidays

Friday, April 3, 2015

PovertyMuseums Micro Newsletter, april -send in worldwide envoy actions by april 30 for next news - chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk< -PM archives
  1.  obama brings his last entrepreneur summit to kenya july; 
  2. Yazmi's 5 billion person elearning satellite 1 2 asked by kenya (during UN womens 1 2 3 summit in march to search water solutions next 
  3.  world banks launch of open learning campus last month began with citizen engagement 1 2 but were's the POP? 
  4.  Its just been announced that Pope Francis is offerening Obama a masterclass on POP on 23 september the day before his review with US congress- this means number 1 envoy question of 2015 is lileky to be how do we free student union clubs everywere to understand and celebrate pop earlier newsletter selection

Monday, July 20, 2009

Interview made with Mrs N Begum female co-founder of Grameen since 1976

Grameen began a project in 1976 of 4 people: Dr Yunus, Mrs N Begum, Professor Latifee, and Dipal Barua. All four lead the bank today in its 33rd year of helping humanity race to poverty museums by designing and replication social businesses round all of community's most vital service needs

Here is an extract on interview made with Mrs Begum summer 08:
Minute 12- Bangladesh 1976 - Gradually we started to talk to the women,- the first reaction , I’m a woman, I cannot do anything. My husband is responsible for any economic activities. Most of them never touch money with their own hand, because the husband is bringing all the things so she is not really handling any money matters. So when we started talking to them , they were really surprised,- oh you go to my husband, he can do something, I cannot do anything. So we gradually convince the women to take some money to start up some business, so some of them – very few – first loanee was Sophia. She was a beggar who startes to work. And others were just observing what was going on. Then one by one they came…seeing those who have the money are doing better. But it was not an easy task. From the beginning we had in our mind that at least 50% should be the women and 50% should be the men. To talk about that is easy, but to involve women in that scenario, it was not easy. So it takes time. One thing I should say, how women feel much better and the position came up. I was in a workshop in Tangi in 1979, and in that workshop I’m talking about: is there any change with their family, with their husband, the relationship? So one woman mentioned my husband never took me to doctor or never brought me any medicine if I feel sick. But later when I joined Grameen and I’m in money, now my husband goes to the doctor, brings the medicine. So I asked what is the reason ? She told me that this is – I am an "earning woman" – the important thing that you are depending on yourself, not dependent on others, husband or son or the father…and you come yourself and you give yourself some confidence. And this is the dignity of life.

So what Dr Yunus wants, to bring the dignity among all these women, vulnerable women, so that they can make their own future, they can make their children’s future, because the mother always loves her child very much.


If you need full 45 minute transcript - please contact chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk washington dc mobile 240 316 8157 you can also ask about 10 hours of transcript made wiht all founding directors of Grameen July 2008 the week the Nobel judges came to Dhaka to celebrate opening a Yunus Museum - a celebration we commemorated by sampling yunus10000 dvds- and 2 years later during Yunus Interdependence weekend 4 July 2010 Glasgow (first commemoration party to Norman Macrae) launch of Journal of Social Business

Monday, December 31, 2007

Xmas 2007: we first traveled to Bangladesh to ask whether youth could help transform education and economics around the worldwide goal of ending poverty. In 2009 we hosted a party with brac and grameen directors. Our dreams of learning from both Yunus and Fazle Abed started to disappear as ever more conflicts surrounded yunus. We started to see tech wizards gravitating round BRAC. To remember the passing of The Economist's Norman Macrae the Japan embassy asked Fazle Abed to host 2 roundtables on the future of teach and of Brac University. 2017: Alipay's first published partnership with sir fazle abed. In 20 dec 2019 sir fazle abed died. This brings us to our number 1 search of 2020s - can ali and brac scholars help youth be the first SDG generation?