welcome from chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk Who do you learn from most? 40 years ago - I co-authored 2025report.com - searching for world's partners in sustainability. After 9/11 I nearly gave up until my friends and I came across Fazle Abed and a billion Asian women's work since 1972. After 15 trips to Bangladesh here's a catalogue of extraordinary partners in sustainability and transforming education..

Thursday, December 31, 2020

fazle abed - greatest human i ever met - resilient community and other livelihood skills which came first at BRAC

60 years ago nothing made my dad, norman macrae, happier than sharing with readers of the economist, solutions 3 billion asians were finding to end poverty- dad had a special reason for such joy- he had spent his last days as a teenager navigating planes of bomber command around today's myanmar and bangladesh- dad knew that the poverty across the majority of the human race -who are continental asians - had been the unintended consequence of british colonialism and the worst corporation english capitalism ever propagated the east india company implememter of eg slave trading and opium as a currency

1977 related ref Rural Keynesianism by chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk
The Economist's end poverty sub-editor and first journalist of the internet's entrepreneurial revolution

Before my father Norman Macrae died in 2010, he set up a small legacy for mainly student female journalist to visit bangladesh to help journalise how women had been empowered to build that nation born in 1971 tenth most populous and 2nd poorest in the world

HOW DID BRAC BUILD AN EDUCATIONAL ECONOMY
I was privileged to enjoy several meetings with sir fazle abed of brac- he was concerned because the nobel peace laureate muhammad yunus had his system confiscated by the government and quite frankly the way western educators and the microcreditsummit process launched (from 1997 onwards) by the clintons explained microfinance was in critical (systemic and exponential growth) ways the exact opposite of how brac truly empowered women to build the bangladeshi economy - far the largest girls empowerment system ever designed with the exception of China. Brac is the benchmark case at huge scale of how healthy and skills-educated societies grow a place across generations not vice versa.

Nowhere in the 75 years since world war 2 has there been a servant leader like Fazle Abed. Before dedicating 50 years to working with the poorest village women he had been the regional ceo for the shell oil multinational. Then at age 35 a cyclone killed half a million people all around him. He concluded that the oil business was meaningless compared with human development work, returned to london to settle up has affairs and to see his flat in Putney, and returned to bangladesh in 1972 with about 20000 dollars. Right from the start, Abed's idea was to maximise community capacity - firstly by peer to training of how to build the minimal village homes but in a way that would be monsoon proof and as far as possible cyclone proof. Because of his experience with global business he was trusted to organise bottom-up disaster relief processes local capacity building was different to the norm of a global relief agency flying in , doing the relief, and then flying out again. It also meant that BRAC's dna was always about skills training- its servant leaders did not see themselves as banker or administrators but coaches as well as inventors of microfranchise designs- the most effective and efficient way that villagers could make things or provide services including health and safety.

we visited bangladesh 15 times between 2007 and sir fazle's death in december 2019- to everyone he asked - will you form a coalition of hundreds of universities to be my legacy- a search we map at abeduni.com but it seemed to us something else needed journalising - his 5 decades merited 5 one-hour transcripts of a life in an hour of fazle abed - this co-blog aims to become such a repository -if you can help rsvp chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk

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